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WHO guidelines make the future of wind farms increasingly fraught as excessive noise is a health risk

Rite On Clime Change Wind turbines

This is exactly what multiple researchers have been saying about wind turbines but to date they have been routinely ridiculed or ignored.

The Organisation highlighted that a lack of quality research into wind farms had made their task more difficult.

Global health authorities have finally recognised what residents living near wind farms have been saying for years; the noise they emit is more than an inconvenience, it is a risk to health.

New guidelines for Europe published by the World Health Organisation put new limits on the amount of noise that wind turbines can emit.

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WHO Europe chief Zsuzsanna Jakab said “more than a nuisance, excessive noise is a health risk — contributing to cardiovascular diseases, for example.”

This is exactly what multiple researchers have been saying about wind farms and wind turbines but to date they have been routinely ridiculed or ignored.

This is the first time WHO has made recommendations regarding wind turbines.

The Organisation highlighted that a lack of quality research had made the task more difficult.

But for average noise exposure, the WHO conditionally recommended “reducing noise levels produced by wind turbines below 45 dB , as wind turbine noise above this level is associated with adverse health effects.”

No recommendation was made for average night noise exposure because the quality of evidence of night-time exposure to wind turbine noise was too low to allow a recommendation.

To reduce health effects, the WHO conditionally recommends that policy-makers implement suitable measures to reduce noise exposure from wind turbines in the population exposed to levels above the guideline values for average noise exposure.

Although the WHO recommendations were drawn up for Europe, they are relevant for the rest of the world because they are based on data from various continents, the WHO said.

The WHO findings add to difficulties already faced by the wind industry regarding noise impact on nearby residents.

An immediate concern is the finding of an independent review the Bald Hills wind farm in South Gippsland was causing harm to some neighbours.

Regardless of what happens next the finding of nuisance under the Public Health and Welfare Act has already spurred threats of a class-action suit.

With recognition by the World Health Organisation of potential health impacts, the outlook for wind farm developers is looking increasingly fraught.

Much will depend on how diligent has been the acoustic monitoring of wind turbine developments both before and after construction.

This is a highly complex area and one that has been heavily criticised.

It is firmly in the sights of the Wind Farm Commissioner.

Independent monitoring of wind farms is needed and strict limits must be obeyed.

The WHO statement makes clear it is a matter of public health.

 

CREDIT

GRAHAM LLOYD  ENVIRONMENT EDITOR  OCTOBER 10, 2018

Don Fairbrother next to windturbines near his property in South Gippsland where residents are impacted by the Bald Hill wind farm. Picture: David Geraghty.

https://www.theaustralian.com.au/opinion/who-guidelines-make-the-future-of-wind-farms-increasingly-fraught/news-story/7afab5830bdff8a53b9ce9aa415daa15


Further reading

Wind Industry Panics as Class Actions Loom: WHO Finds Wind Turbine Noise Harmful to Health

It’s no mystery to those forced to live next to wind turbines that the incessant low-frequency noise they generate is seriously harmful to health.

When humans set out to torture each other, sleep deprivation is usually top of the list. The wind industry has been doing just that, with impunity, for the best part of 20 years.

To that end, the wind industry has been ably aided and abetted by their pet acoustic consultants – a group of ethically bereft mercenaries, who willingly doctor up fake noise reports on demand; reports which always claim their client’s wind farm complies with the toughest noise standards in the world.

In addition, the wind industry enlisted the support of a group of pseudo-scientists (almost always sociologists with bogus claims to medical qualifications) who invented the notion that the suffering experienced by wind farm neighbours is all the product of their febrile, ‘climate denying’ imaginations, whipped along by ‘scaremongers’ like STT and the Waubra Foundation.

One of them, a former tobacco advertising guru, invented his very own diagnostic phrase, calling it the ‘nocebo’ effect.

The guru was so clever, that he could make such a diagnosis without ever having met a single person suffering the effects of exposure to wind turbine noise. With superior, if not superhuman, powers he was able to reach his irrefutable conclusions from the sandstone cloisters of a University in Sydney, thousands of miles away from the victims and their tormentors.

When an Australian Court was presented with evidence by the Waubra Foundation – both scientific and actual – of the harm caused by exposure to low-frequency and infra-sound generated by wind turbines, it had no difficulty in finding that that exposure was a pathway to disease: Australian Court Finds Wind Turbine Noise Exposure a ‘Pathway to Disease’: Waubra Foundation Vindicated

In yet another blow to wind industry blowhards, the World Health Organization has also rejected the nocebo nonsense relied upon to berate their victims and otherwise operate with impunity.

Wind turbines can cause health problems, new World Health Organisations guidelines say
The Australian
AAP
10 October 2018

Wind power generators can cause health problems if they result in people being exposed to excessive noise levels, according to new guidelines for Europe that the World Health Organisation (WHO) has published.

Exposure to wind turbines should not exceed 45 decibels during daytime, the Geneva-based UN agency wrote in the guidelines that it developed on behalf of the European Union.

In comparison, soft radio music has 50 decibels.

Although the recommendations were drawn up for Europe, they are relevant for the rest of the world because they are based on data from various continents, the WHO said.

European policymakers should heed the guidance, WHO Europe chief Zsuzsanna Jakab said in a statement.

“More than a nuisance, excessive noise is a health risk – contributing to cardiovascular diseases, for example,” she added.

German authorities currently recommend a maximum wind turbine noise exposure of 55 decibels during the day.

This update on the previous version from 2009 not only adds wind turbine limits to existing thresholds for aircraft, rail and road traffic: The WHO now also makes recommendations about leisure noise.

The combined exposure from nightclubs, concerts and listening devices should not exceed 70 decibels on average per year – about as loud as a hair dryer.
The Australian

Read the full WHO noise guidelines 2018

WHO guidelines make the future of wind farms increasingly fraught
The AustralianRite-On Wind farm excessive noise violation
Graham Lloyd
10 October 2018

Global health authorities have finally recognised what residents living near wind farms have been saying for years; the noise they emit is more than an inconvenience, it is a risk to health.

New guidelines for Europe published by the World Health Organisation put new limits on the amount of noise that wind turbines can emit.

WHO Europe chief Zsuzsanna Jakab said “more than a nuisance, excessive noise is a health risk — contributing to cardiovascular diseases, for example.”

This is exactly what multiple researchers have been saying about wind turbines but to date they have been routinely ridiculed or ignored.

This is the first time WHO has made recommendations regarding wind turbines.

The Organisation highlighted that a lack of quality research had made the task more difficult.

But for average noise exposure, the WHO conditionally recommended “reducing noise levels produced by wind turbines below 45 dB , as wind turbine noise above this level is associated with adverse health effects.”

No recommendation was made for average night noise exposure because the quality of evidence of night-time exposure to wind turbine noise was too low to allow a recommendation.

To reduce health effects, the WHO conditionally recommends that policy-makers implement suitable measures to reduce noise exposure from wind turbines in the population exposed to levels above the guideline values for average noise exposure.

Although the WHO recommendations were drawn up for Europe, they are relevant for the rest of the world because they are based on data from various continents, the WHO said.

The WHO findings add to difficulties already faced by the wind industry regarding noise impact on nearby residents.

An immediate concern is the finding of an independent review the Bald Hills wind farm in South Gippsland was causing harm to some neighbours.

Regardless of what happens next the finding of nuisance under the Public Health and Welfare Act has already spurred threats of a class-action suit.

With recognition by the World Health Organisation of potential health impacts, the outlook for wind farm developers is looking increasingly fraught.

Much will depend on how diligent has been the acoustic monitoring of wind turbine developments both before and after construction.

This is a highly complex area and one that has been heavily criticised.

It is firmly in the sights of the Wind Farm Commissioner.

Independent monitoring is needed and strict limits must be obeyed.

The WHO statement makes clear it is a matter of public health.
The Australian

Rite On Clime Change Wind turbines

Don Fairbrother: the first of many, many plaintiffs.

 

The most obvious consequence of the WHO’s belated recognition of the fact that exposure wind turbine noise is harmful to health, is that the wind industry’s victims are in a far better position to sue their tormentors, as well as those who ought to have been bringing them to account.

The first of what will soon become a raft of class actions was kicked off by a group of Victorian farmers from Gippsland – including Don Fairbrother (above), who are pursuing action in the Supreme Court of Victoria, seeking $millions in damages from the developer and Council.

The community surrounding the Bald Hills wind farm, built by a Japanese developer, Mitsui and Co, have been tortured by incessant turbine generated low-frequency noise and infrasound since March 2015, when its 52, 2 MW Senvion MM92 turbines spun into action. Neighbours started complaining to the developer about noise, straightaway. Ignored by the developer and the Council, locals lawyered up and engaged the feisty and tenacious Dominica Tannock.

Dominica has been pursuing the South Gippsland Shire Council, responsible under the Victorian Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008, for investigating and remedying nuisance complaints, since April 2016. That effort resulted in a finding that wind turbine noise is a nuisance and harmful to her client’s health, providing the basis for $millions in damages for the loss of the use and enjoyment of their homes, as well as their pain and suffering: Victorian Vengeance: Neighbours Launch $Multi-Million Noise Nuisance Law Suit Against Wind Farm Operator & Local Council

The litigation that has broken out in Victoria, coupled up with the WHO’s report has clearly sharpened thinking amongst those who pretend to care about the lives and livelihoods of those forced to live with wind turbines in their backyards.

Andrew Dyer is Australia’s Wind Farm Commissioner. Notionally, his office is about protecting rural residents from the wind industry. In reality, Dyer has bent over backwards to assist the wind industry to operate with complete impunity.

When Sonia Trist one of Pacific Hydro’s long-suffering victims at Cape Bridgewater resident, who lives within 640 m of wind turbines told Dyer she was “living a life of misery” as her house was now worthless, Dyer simply to her “to move out”. Dyer made no mention of any compensation for the loss of her home and the value of it, by the way. Apparently, the concept of human compassion and decency is not in Dyer’s make up. Although, as it now appears, self-preservation most certainly is.

In the wake of the WHO report, Dyer has changed his tune and, all of a sudden, appears to be very concerned about the effect of wind turbine noise on rural residents.

Wind farm chief urges tighter rules for noise monitoring
The Australian
Graham Lloyd
10 October 2018

Noise monitoring of wind farms must be tightened to ensure they never exceed new guidelines set by the World Health Organisation, Australia’s wind farm commissioner has said.

The WHO yesterday confirmed excessive wind turbine noise could be linked to health problems and for the first time included the renewable energy source in regulations covering road noise, aeroplanes and loud music.

A WHO investigation highlighted a lack of quality research into wind farm noise and health and said because of its special characteristics, existing measurements might not be adequate.

It made a conditional recom­mendation that a level be set for average noise exposure of below 45 decibels.

“Wind turbine noise above this level is associated with adverse health effects,” the WHO said.

Australia’s Wind Farm Commissioner Andrew Dyer said the recommendations were similar to Australian regulations, which ranged from 35dB to 45dB.

Mr Dyer said he would prefer to see a uniform noise level set in all states.

“The important thing is to ensure that the WHO guidelines were not exceeded at any premises,” Mr Dyer said. “The tricky thing in this business is who has authority to set standards, implement them and police them.”

Of particular concern had been the use of the same acoustics consultant for pre- and post-construction measurements.

New regulations in Victoria insist different, independent consultants be used for before and after testing for new projects.

On health, Mr Dyer said more research was needed, including two studies commissioned by the National Health and Medical Research Council, which were not due until after 2020.

The WHO said the evidence on the adverse effects of wind turbine noise was rated low-quality, but it said the noise emitted from wind turbines had other characteristics, including the repetitive nature of the sound of the rotating blades and atmospheric influence leading to a variability of amplitude modulation, which could be the source of above-average annoyance.

“This differentiates it from noise from other sources and has not always been properly characterised,” the WHO said.

This might “limit the ability to observe associations between wind turbine noise and health outcomes”, the WHO said.

Acoustics expert Steven Coop­er said what was missing were socio-acoustic studies to give a dose-response curve to better indicate safe exposure levels.

Mr Cooper has presented research that showed people who were sensitised to wind turbine noise could “sense” the operation of a wind turbine signal in the laboratory even though no one else could hear it.

Mr Cooper said the WHO recommendation was significant, but more work was needed to understand the characteristics of wind turbine noise and the dose response.

“It is a big issue now the WHO has stepped out and said wind turbines can cause health impacts,” he said. “We are getting closer to understanding it and we are doing it with facts.”

The Waubra Foundation, which has campaigned against noise from wind farms, said it welcomed the WHO statement.

“This is long overdue acknowledgment by the WHO of health risks from excessive wind turbine noise,” the foundation said.
The Australian

Rite-On Wind Turbine Victim

Sonia Trist: one of Pacific Hydro’s victims at Cape Bridgewater.

 

Given his past performance, STT suspects Andrew Dyer’s concerns are more about being named as a defendant, along with a raft of other officials and bureaucrats who, like Dyer, have happily relied upon bogus and completely irrelevant noise ‘rules’, faked noise reports produced by the developer’s pet acoustic consultants and the rubbish about ‘nocebo’ effects, cooked up by wind worshipping pseudo-scientists, to treat those they are legally responsible for with complete and utter contempt.

The WHO’s report means that people like Dyer can no longer get away with ignoring or berating people suffering from exposure to practically incessant wind turbine noise; people just like Sonia Trist.

As the number of wind industry victims mounts, the number of potential plaintiffs ready to exact revenge increases, too. From his rapid about-face, Andrew Dyer seems acutely aware that those victims will be looking to visit their vengeance upon spineless characters just like him.

Let the reckoning begin.

Rite-On Wind Farm Noise Cl;ass action

 

CREDIT

https://stopthesethings.com/2018/10/13/wind-industry-panics-as-class-actions-loom-who-finds-wind-turbine-noise-harmful-to-health/

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